Frame Selection

Choosing the Right Frames

Glasses say so much about your personality and personal style. At Designer Family Eyecare, we are happy to work with you in selecting frames that complement your features. Our experienced optometry professionals work closely with you to select the proper frames to fit your budget as well as your cosmetic, lifestyle, and vision needs. While working with our experienced staff enables you to select the appropriate frames, we invite you to learn more about which frame styles complement various face shapes.

Select Your Frames

Square

A square face is often characterized by a strong jaw line, a broad forehead, and a wide chin and cheekbones. The width and length of the face are close to being equal. Frames should be selected to make the face look longer and to soften the square angles of the face. Choose frames that are slightly curved (like an oval shape) and that have more horizontal than vertical real estate.

Oval

The oval face is identifiable by its balanced proportions. The forehead is slightly wider than the chin and cheekbones are high. Frames should complement the natural proportions of the oval. Choose frames that are wide or wider than the broadest part of the face and that follow your brow line. Often, diamond or rectangular shapes work best for oval shapes.

Oblong

Although fairly similar to an oval shape, an oblong face is longer than it is wide. The ideal frames will shorten the face by creating a break in the length of the face. Choose frames that have depth and a low bridge to shorten the nose. Try frames that are round, deep, have low-triangle shapes, or that have strong vertical lines.

Round

A round or full face is characterized by having the same width and length. For round faces, frames that add length to the face often work best. Frames that lengthen the face are typically angular, narrow and are wider than they are deep. It is best to avoid round style frames as these will exaggerate the roundness and curves of the face.

Heart

A heart shaped face looks like a heart or a triangle with the point facing down. The forehead is very wide and cheekbones are high while the face narrows towards the chin. Counterbalance the narrow chin by choosing frames that are wider at the bottom. Generally, light colored and rimless frames work best, although aviator, butterfly and low-triangle styles also work well.

Triangle

A base-down triangle face has a narrower forehead with full cheeks and a broad chin. To offset a broad chin, select frames that widen at the top. Great selections include frames that have heavy color accents and detail on the top part of the frames. Cat-eye shapes also work well to add width and emphasize the narrow upper part of the face.

Diamond

A diamond shaped face is often characterized by high, dramatic cheekbones with a narrow eye line and jaw line. This shape is the rarest of all the shapes. Oval frames that are soft in style typically work best to highlight the eyes and cheekbones. Select frames that have detailing, distinctive brow lines, are rimless or a cat-eye shape for best results.

Square Face

A square face is often characterized by a strong jaw line, a broad forehead, and a wide chin and cheekbones. The width and length of the face are close to being equal. Frames should be selected to make the face look longer and to soften the square angles of the face. Choose frames that are slightly curved (like an oval shape) and that have more horizontal than vertical real estate.

Oval Face

The oval face is identifiable by its balanced proportions. The forehead is slightly wider than the chin and cheekbones are high. Frames should complement the natural proportions of the oval. Choose frames that are wide or wider than the broadest part of the face and that follow your brow line. Often, diamond or rectangular shapes work best for oval shapes.

Oblong Face

Although fairly similar to an oval shape, an oblong face is longer than it is wide. The ideal frames will shorten the face by creating a break in the length of the face. Choose frames that have depth and a low bridge to shorten the nose. Try frames that are round, deep, have low-triangle shapes, or that have strong vertical lines.

Round Face

A round or full face is characterized by having the same width and length. For round faces, frames that add length to the face often work best. Frames that lengthen the face are typically angular, narrow and are wider than they are deep. It is best to avoid round style frames as these will exaggerate the roundness and curves of the face.

Heart Shaped Face (or Base-up Triangle)

A heart shaped face looks like a heart or a triangle with the point facing down. The forehead is very wide and cheekbones are high while the face narrows towards the chin. Counterbalance the narrow chin by choosing frames that are wider at the bottom. Generally, light colored and rimless frames work best, although aviator, butterfly and low-triangle styles also work well.

Base-down Triangle Face

A base-down triangle face has a narrower forehead with full cheeks and a broad chin. To offset a broad chin, select frames that widen at the top. Great selections include frames that have heavy color accents and detail on the top part of the frames. Cat-eye shapes also work well to add width and emphasize the narrow upper part of the face.

Diamond Face

A diamond shaped face is often characterized by high, dramatic cheekbones with a narrow eye line and jaw line. This shape is the rarest of all the shapes. Oval frames that are soft in style typically work best to highlight the eyes and cheekbones. Select frames that have detailing, distinctive brow lines, are rimless or a cat-eye shape for best results.

This is a general guide and is only intended for reference. Our experienced and trained staff will assist you in selecting frames what work best for your lifestyle.

Exclusive Offer

New Client Special! Receive 40% off any frame in stock with purchase of lenses!

Office Hours

*Please call for more information on additional hours not listed.

Monday:

10:00 am-6:00 pm

Tuesday:

10:00 am-6:00 pm

Wednesday:

10:00 am-6:00 pm

Thursday:

10:00 am-6:00 pm

Friday:

10:00 am-8:00 pm

Saturday:

10:00 am-2:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed

Location

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Testimonials

Reviews From Our Satisfied Patients

  • "We use Anderson Optometry for all of our family’s vision needs. Recently, we had to have our youngest fitted for new glasses and he made the experience fun for her and informative for us. We know Dr. Anderson will always take good care of our family’s eye care and that’s why we wouldn’t go to anywhere else."
    The Harrison Family
  • "Dr. Anderson and his staff are so patient and friendly. Dr. Anderson prescribed me glasses and I had the toughest time picking out frames. They didn’t rush, but instead made helpful suggestions and now I have an awesome pair of frames, not to mention the fact that I can see ten times better than before. You guys are the best!"
    Shelly
  • "I’ve been going to Dr. Anderson for over five years now and even though I only see him once a year for my annual exam, he and his staff always make me feel very welcome and take care of all my eye care needs. Anderson Optometry is the best at what they do and make you feel right at home."
    Anthony
  • "I was having headaches and felt my contacts were easily drying out all the time. I went in to see Dr. Anderson and after an evaluation, he suggested a switch in the type of lenses I use. Within a week of using the new lenses, I noticed a change and haven’t had any problems since. Thanks, Dr. Anderson!"
    Matt
  • "I had considered Lasik surgery in the past, but was still hesitant about the process. Dr. Anderson was very thorough in his consultation with me and answered all of my questions, making me feel comfortable with going forward with the procedure. I’m so glad I did the Lasik, it has been of great convenience to me and my sight has never been better"
    Carol

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