What Happens When You Don't Wear Sunglasses?

What Happens When You Don't Wear Sunglasses?

Sunglasses aren't just a fashion statement. Wearing sunglasses on a regular basis is a simple way to protect your vision and avoid common eye diseases and conditions.

How the Sun Can Damage Your Eyes

Too much sun is just as bad for your eyes as it is for your skin. When you spend time in the sun without adequate protection, you may be more likely to develop a variety of eye issues, ranging from corneal "sunburns" to cataracts. Eye conditions associated with sun exposure include:

  • Photokeratitis: Photokeratitis occurs when your corneas are exposed to intense sunlight. The condition is particularly common if you spend the day on the beach or on the ski slopes, as both snow and sand intensify the effects of the sun. This sunburn-like condition can cause redness, blurred vision, tearing and sensitivity to light. You might also feel as if there's something stuck in your eyes. Photokeratitis generally only lasts about one or two days but can be very painful.
  • Pterygium: Pterygium, also known as "surfer's eye", can happen to anyone who spends long hours in the sun without wearing appropriate eye protection. The condition causes fleshy, raised bumps to appear on the whites of the eyes. If the condition isn't treated promptly, the growth can cover the cornea, affecting vision, or may even cause astigmatism. Mild cases are treated with medicated drops, while more serious growths may require surgery.
  • Macular Degeneration: Sun exposure may be a factor in the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The condition causes a blind spot in the center of your vision and is a leading cause of vision loss in people 50 and older, according to the National Eye Institute. Although there is currently no effective treatment for AMD, low vision aides can help you make the most of your usable vision.
  • Cataracts: The sun also plays a role in the formation of a cataract, or cloudy lens. The lens of your eye focuses light rays on your retina and is necessary for clear vision. When it clouds, you may experience blurry or faded vision, halos around lights, double vision, light sensitivity and difficulty driving at night. Cataracts are removed during outpatient surgery when they begin to affect the quality of your life.
  • Cancer: Cancer is another potential unpleasant consequence of sun exposure. Melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer, can affect several parts of your eyes, including the eyelids, iris or choroid, a layer of tissue between the retina and sclera. Common treatments include radiation, thermotherapy, and surgery.

Things to Consider When Shopping for Sunglasses

Fortunately, it's easy to reduce your risk of developing sun-related eye conditions and diseases by wearing sunglasses every day. When you shop for sunglasses, keep these suggestions in mind:

  • Look for Glasses That Offer Maximum Protection. The most effective sunglasses block 99 percent of ultraviolet B (UVB) rays and 95 percent of ultraviolet A (UVA) rays, according to the American Optometric Association. Sunglasses don't have to be expensive to be effective. Both inexpensive and costly glasses can provide the same protection from UVA and UVB rays.
  • Choose Gray, Green or Amber Lenses for Better Vision. Although lens color doesn't have an impact on ultraviolet ray transmission, it can improve contrast, making it easier to see in sunny weather.
  • Choose Wraparound Styles. You may still experience eye damage if the sun's rays penetrate the sides or top of your sunglasses. Styles that wrap around your face offer the best protection.
  • Make Comfort a Priority. If your sunglasses are uncomfortable, they'll spend more time in their case than on your face. The most comfortable glasses may not necessarily be the most stylish, although manufacturers offer plenty of attractive frames in every price range.
  • Buy a Spare Pair. Sunglasses are one of the most common items collected by lost and found departments. In fact, more than 55 percent of adults lose or break their sunglasses every year, according to The Vision Council. Purchasing a backup pair will help you ensure that you're always protected.

Whether you're concerned about an eye condition, need prescription sunglasses or are due for an exam, we're committed to helping you maintain your vision. Contact us to schedule your next appointment.

Sources:

National Eye Institute: Keep Your Eyes Healthy: Wear Sunglasses

https://nei.nih.gov/hvm/healthy_eyes_glasses

American Optometric Association: Overlooking the Importance of UV Protection: Only 40 Percent of Americans Wear Sunglasses to Safeguard Vision, 5/20/13

https://www.aoa.org/newsroom/uv-overlooking-the-importance-of-uv-protection

American Academy of Ophthalmology: How to choose the Best Sunglasses, 5/1/15

https://www.aao.org/eye-health/tips-prevention/top-sunglasses-tips

Skin Cancer Foundation: How Sunlight Damages the Eyes, 12/7/12

https://www.skincancer.org/prevention/sun-protection/for-your-eyes/how-sunlight-damages-the-eyes

National Eye Institute: Facts About Age-Related Macular Degeneration, 9/15

https://nei.nih.gov/health/maculardegen/armd_facts

The Vision Council: For Millions of Americans, Missing Sunglasses Mean Harmful Exposure to UV, 5/15/12

https://www.thevisioncouncil.org/blog/millions-americans-missing-sunglasses-means-harmful-exposure-uv

Exclusive Offer

New Client Special! Receive 40% off any frame in stock with purchase of lenses!

Office Hours

*Please call for more information on additional hours not listed.

Monday:

10:00 am-6:00 pm

Tuesday:

10:00 am-6:00 pm

Wednesday:

10:00 am-6:00 pm

Thursday:

10:00 am-6:00 pm

Friday:

10:00 am-8:00 pm

Saturday:

10:00 am-2:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed

Location

Find us on the map

Testimonials

Reviews From Our Satisfied Patients

  • "We use Anderson Optometry for all of our family’s vision needs. Recently, we had to have our youngest fitted for new glasses and he made the experience fun for her and informative for us. We know Dr. Anderson will always take good care of our family’s eye care and that’s why we wouldn’t go to anywhere else."
    The Harrison Family
  • "Dr. Anderson and his staff are so patient and friendly. Dr. Anderson prescribed me glasses and I had the toughest time picking out frames. They didn’t rush, but instead made helpful suggestions and now I have an awesome pair of frames, not to mention the fact that I can see ten times better than before. You guys are the best!"
    Shelly
  • "I’ve been going to Dr. Anderson for over five years now and even though I only see him once a year for my annual exam, he and his staff always make me feel very welcome and take care of all my eye care needs. Anderson Optometry is the best at what they do and make you feel right at home."
    Anthony
  • "I was having headaches and felt my contacts were easily drying out all the time. I went in to see Dr. Anderson and after an evaluation, he suggested a switch in the type of lenses I use. Within a week of using the new lenses, I noticed a change and haven’t had any problems since. Thanks, Dr. Anderson!"
    Matt
  • "I had considered Lasik surgery in the past, but was still hesitant about the process. Dr. Anderson was very thorough in his consultation with me and answered all of my questions, making me feel comfortable with going forward with the procedure. I’m so glad I did the Lasik, it has been of great convenience to me and my sight has never been better"
    Carol

We answer all your crazy eyecare questions

Don't worry... everyone wonders!

  • Are Floaters A Sign Of Something Bigger?

    Worried about floaters? Find out when this common vision symptom can be a sign of a serious problem. ...

    Read More
  • Frequently Asked Questions

    Why do I need to see an eye care provider? Many “silent” diseases, such as glaucoma and diabetes, can only be detected through regular eye exams. When these conditions are discovered earlier rather than later, they become easier to treat or manage, allowing for better long-term preservation of eyesight. ...

    Read More
  • Pediatric Ophthlamology

    Ophthalmology addresses the physiology, anatomy and diseases of the eyes. Pediatric ophthalmology focuses on the eyes of children. Pediatric ophthalmologists examine children’s eyes to see if they need corrective lenses or other treatments to improve their vision. Training for Pediatric Ophthalmologists Pediatric ...

    Read More
  • Allergies

    Caused by the same irritants as hay fever, runny nose, coughing, and sneezing, eye allergies commonly affect those who suffer from other allergy symptoms. Not only do eye allergies cause discomfort, but they can also interfere with daily activities. Eye Allergy Causes Medically referred to as allergic ...

    Read More
  • Learning-Related Vision Problems

    Learning disabilities may include dyslexia, math disorder, writing disorder, auditory processing deficits, or visual processing deficits. Although each child with a learning disability is unique, many also have associated visual problems. Addressing these vision disorders may alleviate some symptoms ...

    Read More
  • UV Radiation and Your Eyes

    Optometry warnings about the damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation on our eyes have not yet reached the degree of public awareness of that of skin damage. Yet, the sun can be just as damaging upon our eyes with unprotected exposure. Short-term exposure to very bright sunlight can result in a type ...

    Read More
  • How To Protect Your Eyes While Wearing Halloween-Themed Contact Lenses

    Spooky novelty contact lenses can make your Halloween costume even scarier, but are they safe? ...

    Read More
  • Fuchs' Corneal Dystrophy

    Fuchs' dystrophy (pronounced fooks DIS-truh-fee) is an eye disease characterized by degenerative changes to the cornea’s innermost layer of cells. The cause for Fuchs' dystrophy is not fully understood. If your mother or father has the disease, then there is roughly a 50 percent chance that you will ...

    Read More
  • Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    One of the leading causes of vision loss in people who are age 50 or older is age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This common eye condition leads to damage of a small spot near the center of the retina called the macula. The macula provides us with the ability to clearly see objects that are straight ...

    Read More
  • Diabetic Eye Diseases

    Diabetes is a condition that involves high blood sugar (glucose) levels. This can affect many parts of the body, including the eyes. One of the most common diabetic eye diseases is diabetic retinopathy, which is also a leading cause of blindness in American adults. Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic retinopathy ...

    Read More
No form settings found. Please configure it.